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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 245 (some duplicates have been removed)
very easily. >>> author of numerous books on abraham lincoln recalls the four months between president lincoln's election and a number of 1860 to his inauguration in march, 1861. during this time the president was pressured by republicans and democrats throughout the country to maintain the union. it's a little over an hour. >> welcome to the virtual book signing here at the abraham lincoln bookshop as always. i'm daniel weinberg and i am pleased to have you here. it is a lincoln civil war book signing at work. it's a wonderful way for you to build a first edition signed library with all of the books coming out over the next few years in the lincoln bicentennial which is upon us but also the war that follows the heels there are so many books coming out and we are going to try to weed through them and have the authors on the show so you can see the best research going and also you have to weed out others that you don't have to have always. there are too many books out there. >> i say that as a book dealer we adjust them for book signings and that is what distinguishes us. if you are wat
on the bible of martin luther king and abraham lincoln, as he re-enacts the oath of office from the capitol this morning. there it is right there. what a magnificent sight it is. robin, i know you're watching from home today. i wish you could be down here with us. we cannot wait to have you back. the whole gang is in new york, as well. we'll be covering the inauguration all day long on abc news. josh elliott out on the mall right now. josh, you've been tracking the celebrations all weekend long. what do you have right now? >> i'm actually here on pennsylvania avenue, veritably, in the shadow of the capitol, as the parade makes its way past. barack obama and the presidency, the realization of the dual dream of dr. king and abraham lincoln. he'll be using those two bibles when he takes the public oath of office, again, all leading to a remarkable day here on the national mall. overnight, the president attended the first event of his second term, a candlelight reception. >> what we're doing is celebrating each other. and celebrating this incredible nation that we call home. >> reporter: where
and invites them to watch a movie with spielberg. i'm referring to "lincoln." basically the republican party keeps talking on two sides of their face and not being hon west the american people they just don't like this president. but that's one of the reasons why the president recognizes his vacuum when it comes to that leadership. that's why he keeps sending vice president biden down to the congress to the negotiate on his behalf because they just don't like him. >> let's look at the record, maria teresa. speaker boehner has declined invitations to state dinners for each of the following countries, south korea, germany, china, mexico, india, and, of course, great britain. as for republican senate leader mitch mcconnell he turned down invasions for the state dinners of india and china. he even declined to come to the white house then the president was celebrating his home state's college basketball championships. but it's the president's fault that republicans aren't comfortable with him. explain that to me. >> something that may not be well-known is when boehner actually did go to one of th
. >>> and president obama will take the oath of office on the same bible that abraham lincoln used. we'll give you a close look at this extraordinary piece of american history. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> let's begin this hour with the breaking news. algeria's official news agency has just announced the end of a rescue operation aimed at freeing hostages including americans held by islamic militants. u.s. government officials tell cnn that may not necessarily, though be the case. let's get straight to our pentagon correspondent chris lawrence working this story for us. chris, be what is the very latest that you're hearing? >> wolf, the latest that we're getting from u.s. officials is that some americans may have escaped but some may still be held by those hostage takers and they are still seeing signs perhaps of some intermittent fighting suggesting that perhaps this isn't over yet. as the hostage situation stretched to a second day, u.s. officials scrambled to find a resolution and determine the state of the americans still in militant hands. >>
possible. without douglass, there is no obama. >> without lincoln, there is no obama. so it's not only a matter, is it, of faith in history, it's a matter of faith in people who have the imagination and the audacity to make history. >> absolutely. and certainly frederick douglass understood his role in terms of acting as an advocate during lincoln's administration. he was obviously putting some pressure on the white house. at the same time, he was issuing a call to arms to his own community to rise up because he understood that history ultimately comes from below. it isn't -- you know, is it part of he's enveloping lincoln in a movement. there's a movement that surrounds lincoln and the other abolitionists to move all of this forward and make it a reality. >> there weren't 10,000 people with you there at the tomb, but the poem suggests someone else had been there and left this newspaper? >> there were other pele who had come before me and had left various objects. i don't know who they were. someone had left a newspaper. perhaps aware, perhaps not that douglass himself had been a journ
the ranks of washington, jefferson, lincoln and roosevelt. >>> the vice president was sworn in today at the naval observatory by justice sonia sotomayor with the family bible. >> that i take this obligation freely. >> that i take this obligation freely. >> without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion. >> without any mental reservation or purpose of evasion. >> and that i will well and faithfully discharge. >> and i will well and faithfully discharge. >> the duties of the office on which i am about to enter. >> the duties of the office of which i'm about to enter. >> so help me god. >> so help me god. >> congratulations. >> thank you, your honor. >> the vice president will also take the oath again in a public ceremony. >>> also in washington today, slain civil rights leader, reverend martin luther king jr. was honored during a wreath-laying ceremony, it happened at the king memorial here on the national mall. tomorrow's presidential inauguration coincides with the day the nation celebrates dr. king's birthday. and when president obama takes the oath of office, he will use a bi
not always work out well for vice presidents. in 1865, lincoln's second term, that's significant speech will remember -- that magnificent speech, healing speech -- his vice president was ander johnsorew johnson. affusion ticket in 1864 -- a fusion ticket in 1864. johnson arrived with the flu. he gave, for what it was all accounts, a completely inebriated address. lincoln was mortified. it said the public image -- set the public image of andrew johnson. another disastrous vice- presidential inaugural address was calvin coolidge's. he used that opportunity to state and how the filibuster should be done away with. president roosevelt's second inauguration, that is when the congress started before the president. now presidents and vice presidents began to be sworn outside of the steps. there was one exception in the long tradition of inauguration's being held in the capital. that was in 1945, when franklin roosevelt was being sworn in for a fourth time. he was the only president of united states to serve more than two terms. his third inauguration was of the capital. his fourth one was in t
laying his left hand on two bibles -- one owned by abraham lincoln and the other owned by dr. martin luther king, jr. afterward, obama will deliver a speech laying out his plans for the next four years. the nro ceremony will include music from singers james taylor, beyoncÉ, and others which will carry live during our extended five-our inauguration special. after our regular broadcast ends, we will continue to bring you coverage until 1:00 p.m. eastern standard time, including the swearing in ceremony. some stations will run the whole five our special, for others you can go to democracynow.org. this year, the inauguration also comes on the federal holiday in honor of dr. martin luther king, jr., who delivered his "i have a dream" speech 50 years ago, not far from here at the lincoln memorial. later in our special coverage, we will air excerpts of some of dr. king's less often played speeches, including "beyond vietnam." why he opposed the war in vietnam. but first, we turn to some of the voices of hope and resistance from sunday night's piece ball. not affiliated with any political p
of martin luther king and abraham lincoln. this is martin luther king day. we celebrate that, as well. the second time a president has been inaugurated on martin luther king day. about 800,000 people will be there on the mall. a little bit smaller than four years ago. but no less buoyant. a lot of smiling faces out there. we hear the choir of p.s. 22 in staten island. >> they are the largest choir in staten island. and i believe they are fifth graders. let's listen to them for a second. ♪ don't pay no mind to the feeling, until you feel it ♪ >> we love the caps. we love the swaying this morning. we've been thinking to ourselves, a second inauguration is typically not as -- not as surprising as the first inauguration. but nonetheless, it rededicates this country to big ideas. and the person who has to do it in his speech, walking up to the podium, is the president. we saw the first family walking in to st. john's church earlier this morning. >> they're at that worship service right now. there they are, right there, just before they walked into st. john's episcopal church, across th
lincoln noted in the first inauguration address, first, one section of our country slavery is right while the other believes it's wrong and ought to be extended. -- sorry and ought not to be extended. it's the only substantial dispute. period. close quote. the president of the confederate states of america, jefferson davis reminded his congress in 1861, these are his words, a labor of african slaves was and independenceble to our prosperity. so with the interest of such overwhelming magnitude imperilled by the election to the presidency of antislavery man like abraham lincoln, he went, the people of the southern states he said were driven to the adoption and song course of action to avert the danger with which they were openly men answered. and that course of action, of course, was leaving the federal union. davis was not overstating the stakes for him and fellow slave owners. the more than 12 million soul who was resided in the southern states in 1860, nearly one out of three of those people was enslaved. was owned outright by other people. and on the market of the day, those nearly 4 mi
address in history is the second inaugural address which is lincoln which some people say surpasses the gettysburg address. it's the best lay sermon no history. >> and dr. jill bide ep is accompanied by honey alexander, the wife of senator lamar alexander. and by debby boehner, wife of house speaker john boehner. sorry to interrupt you there. >> more recently, you may disagree with the content and the tone but no one will dispute the fact that george w. bush was aiming for the bleachers with his second inaugural with what he called his freedom speech which is -- in terms of projecting american force, moral and military around the world in the wake of 9/11 and the doctrine of preemptive military action. >> you knows the reference to lincoln, we talk about being in a divided america now. in many ways we are politically. but you think about lincoln and that inauguration, both of his, it was a different level. >> different level all together. he is involved in the conflict where half a million people would be killed, the end of channeled slavery. a lot is at stake. we're fighting now bu
. then clinton proceeded to introduce the movie "lincoln." listen. >> president lincoln struggled to apolish slavery and reminds us that even during progress is caldron of principle and compromise. it gives us hope that we can do it again. >> andrea: history lesson. it was the southern democrats, bill clinton, born at the time of lincoln in the state of arkansas probably would have opposed what lincoln was trying to do. so, again -- >> dana: or he would have been a republican. >> andrea: the left trying to co-op what the right has done with president. >> kimberly: disgusting. >> dana: there is politics in hollywood and politics in d.c. i prefer them not mixed up on the play. this is the segment that i loved when costner won for "hatfield and mccoys." it was classy and from the heart. >> first time i came in this room i was unknown actor and red carpet, i walked op it and the bulbs were going and flashing and the photographers yelling at the actors. to look at them, nobody said anything to me. it's a great night to celebrate but more importantly get a chance illuminate movies people might not
of texas. he can rise above everyday politics and speak to history. lincoln did in the 1865, f.d.r. in 1937, now it's obama's chance." did he do that? >> yeah, i think he did it pretty well. this wasn't lincoln 1865 but we haven't had one since. the closest was roosevelt 1937. we're not likely to see that, charlie. i thought he did whatrand said he should do. i appreciate what mark is saying but i think this is not a programmatic speech. this is not a speech where you talk about here's my four-point jobs program. it's a speech about vision and i thought he gave a good sense of where he wanted the country to be i think it clearly was a progressive democratic speech. in f you read reagan's in 1985 it was a conservative republican speech. and a as for those who say -- i watched fox news who say he didn't offer olive branches or reach across the table to try to encourage birtisanship, i would note 16 years ago bill clinton in his second inaugural said that you have sent a democratic president and a republican congress back to washington, you didn't send us back to engage in bickering and partis
to touch lincoln's bible. >>> we have got fog this morning -- just kidding. that was last sunday. no fogfest here. did i trick you, chuck? >> don't scare me. we have been baby sitting the forecast very carefully with everybody coming into town, and with the fog bank last week i don't want to hear the word "fog" for a while. and for early morning joggers and walkers and people heading out to the services, temperatures are in the 30s near 40 degrees, and very mild by january standards. and a breeze has windchills in the low to mid-30s, and there's a touch of bundle up factor and not all that cold. and up in the low 50s for a time today, we will see clouds on the increase and it's going to be a breezy day today. cold front number one, that will be the breeze and the beginning of the cooldown. how much cooler? may see snow flurries on the parade tomorrow ahead of the true arctic air. our coldest air in more than two years coming our way for the rest of the week coming up. >>> right now, getting around the district is not difficult but that will change in the next 24 hours. here is a
the other side of the national mall on the walls of the lincoln memorial are inscribed in my opinion some of the finest words ever written by abraham lincoln in which he faced a bitterly divided country and was able to deliver an address that aimed at unity, brought the country together. and you know, while the challenges we face are different than those that lincoln faced, they are still formidable for this president. our country is deeply divided. we've been through a divided election, which is a lot like what abraham lincoln went through. the challenge for the president is to bring the country together, sound a vision for the country that is eloquent and will inspire americans to come together and get behind him and get behind our elected leaders to work for the good of the country. >> it's interesting you mention lincoln. a lot of people believe his second inaugural address is the last time we had a strong inaugural address. brett o'donnell, thank you. appreciate that. >> good to be with you. >>> the parade, the parties, the pomp, the circumstance, we'll dig into it all on this specia
, richard nixon, to eisenhower, fdr, woodrow wilson, william mckinley, ulysses s. grant, abraham lincoln, anger jackson, james monroe, james madison, thomas jefferson, and george washington. down on the national mall where the crowds are gathering, we have a reporter in the middle of everything. >> right from a capital, in the middle of the national mall, three ladies with us and make the journey to this and operation. >> i am gloria, from seattle. >> michelle, new york. >> marion, pennsylvania. >> you decided to meet here. >> we are all three sisters. >> why did you decide to come to washington for the 57 and operation? >> i think we regretted not being here quarter years ago. we decided we would not miss it this time around. >> we never thought about it or we did not think it is possible to come altogether. >> how did this all happened? how did each of you get here? >> i drove up from pennsylvania. >> i flew in. >> gives me an average cost of how much this will come to, the bill to be here in washington and to stay overnight. >> probably over $2,000. hotel're able to find a and do all
. >> of course, there was lincoln's second inaugural where he talked about the wounds of the nation. we know that the president has been working on this president for weeks and major garrett, our chief white house correspondent, is at the white house this morning with a little bit of insight on what we might hear today. >> well, good morning, scott. those closest to the president tell us this speech is in the moment and it's going to talk, they hope, credibly, believably about responsibilities ahead. and the prospect for not only bipartisan compromise, and things that didn't seem achievable four years ago. it might be worth reminding us ourselves how the president ended first inaugural address four years ago. scott, the president talked about america being in the midst of a winter of our hardship and he urged the nation to brave icy currents and to endure whatever storms may come. there was a sense of forboding then, a sense of crisis, both economic and otherwise, that white house advisers that he feels is no longer as present now as it was then. so that's part of the optimistic note he'll s
affleck for winning for "argo," but i have to say "lincoln" had seven nominations, and they got robbed. >> you thought it did. >> it got -- >> you have been screaming about it. a lot of people thought he got robbed because he didn't get an oscar nomination, meaning ben affleck. >> at the globes you're nominated for seven, and "lincoln" got one? that is -- >> you would have to talk to the people who nominated it and -- see, i haven't seen "argo" yet. i saw "lincoln" yesterday. i really, really loved it. it was sensational. if you love those kindof things, can i recommend a movie that i think i loved even more on the same -- pretty much the same subject. there's a movie called "amazing grace" about a man named william wilb wilburforth who personally led a 20-year battle to get rid of the slave trade in britain. he was a member of parliament. it's a brilliant movie. michael abtett directed it. it's so, so good. you know, all that happened, i think, some 20 some years even before it happened in our country, so -- i loved "lincoln", and i agree it's a magnificent piece of work, and speilber
this kind of insanity -- this kind of material. this happens to be the abraham lincoln inauguration, documenting that formal sense, but there is a quality to these inaugurations that are very important because the tone is very carefully constructed, often. sometimes you lose your control, such as with polk, but often times everybody knows that every aspect of an inauguration will be examined for meaning, what is being said, the undercurrents -- do you ride up to the capital in a carriage in splendor? do you walk back as a man of the people, as jimmy carter did? there is careful balance. when you look at some of this material, you can see over time that, in fact, they are carefully crafting it as well. i have always been amazed in looking at jimmy carter's inaugural serial, how informal his material tends to be compared to other presidents, and it is clearly a statement that following the nixon years, the imperial presidency, they were going to have a residency of the people -- presidency of the people. you notice that on his tickets, rather than having an inaugural ball, he has an i
by chance. when lincoln creates -- lincoln creates some really great was but one of the first words he thought about secession. he said that secession is the sugar coating, the impact of this country. lincoln when he first used sugarcoated, the printers of the united states comes to lincoln and said we cannot put this in the official record, the word sugarcoated. and lincoln says i can't imagine any american not knowing what you're saying. lincoln was also, again i'm going back to william safire's influence, one of the first uses of cool, not innocent of temperature but in the sense of being callous, he said, something he said that was cool. that was callous. it was a behavioral thing. so again, those are, a word like cool. obama could come up with a new name of cool. that's another thing. one word and you give it different many. as i said with all these different meanings. and how i did this was i did a lot of reading and i get a lot of use of huge proprietary databases at the library of congress. 19th century database where you can find the original document in which 1807 when jeffer
: and abraham lincoln's, delivered to a nation divided by civil war. >> with malice toward none, with charity for all. >> reporter: a third theme, renewing our commitment to the values of our founding fathers. perhaps it's surprising the president found inspiration in the words of this former a adversa adversary. >> there can be no human rights without human liberty. >> reporter: aides tell us that, although the president disagrees with mr. bush's policy, he's moved by the speech's democratic principles. >> freedom by its nature must be chosen and defended by citizens. >> reporter: a message, aides say, the president will echo today, as he did at the white house last week. >> that most fundamental set of rights, to life and liberty and the pursuit of happiness. those rights are at stake. we're responsible. >> reporter: of all his predecessors, the president says he is most inspired by president lincoln. >> that government of the people, by the people, for the people shall not perish from the earth. >> reporter: in november, mr. obama screened steven spielberg's movie "lincoln" at the white ho
four years ago. remember when lincoln came into office they were already plotting against him. he had to come in through baltimore and hide at the willard. this president had to come in against mitch mcconnell, the republican leader, saying my number-one goal in life is to get rid of this president. >> and he failed. so i think it's different in some ways and not different in others. i think we are still going to see a very large portion of the republican caucus that believes deeply in what they believe in. that have districts at home that will support them very strongly against the president. but the question is on various issues, can the president put together 30, 40, 50 republicans and pass some of these things? as joe was saying, on immigration, he can do that. chris: for four years the republicans have painted him as a lefty, off in the poll. it seems to me right now, even thote's all temporal, that he's been able to identify the n.r.a. as the far right and to separate them. nerpped, the right is more out of step than he is -- in other words, the right is more out of step than he
foundation. >>> next, rush limbaugh has a theory about why so many on the left are fans of the movie "lincoln." >> why is bill clinton out there at the golden globes last night being brought on stage to thunderous standing ovations to talk about lincoln and what he did during -- what did lincoln do? as far as these people are concerned, he wiped out the south. but he didn't finish, so what the left is admitting today that they are doing is once -- trying to finish it off. lincoln did not fully finish. they're all focused on gods and guns in the south. they love both of them. and so the south has to be wiped out again. i'm telling you, essentially there is an all-out effort being made to marginalize conservatism. >> reminds me of radio rwanda in the bad old days. it's been far right republicans obviously doing all the civil war talk. they're the ones talking about the civil war, about nullification of federal laws and all the secession petitions out there. >>> before house republicans head off for their annual retreat this week, i think it's in williamsburg, the democratic congressional campai
in abraham lincoln's inauguration another belonging to dr. martin luther king jr. who we honor today. the president referenced the slain civil rights leader prominently in the remarks. he took on gay rights and immigration and entitlements and the deep political divide across our nation. first to the parade route. john roberts will travel with the parade along pennsylvania avenue if the technical gods allow it. john, good afternoon. >> so far the gods are with us. if we could spin the camera over here a little bit you can see the east front of the capitol the president will join the motorcade coming out of the driveway from the east front to the constitution avenue. this will be in the next hour and a half to two hours. the parade is 1.5 mile long including a mix of civilian and military contributions, mostly marching bands and a lost floats that will be brought in from the civilian side of things something implemented in 1841 by william henry harrison. you will know he liked to do things big. he had the longist inaugural address of anyone at two hours in horrible weather and he did
special significance. it's the one that president abraham lincoln took the oath on back in 1861. president obama also used it during his last inauguration. the lincoln bible will be on display at the library of congress from january 23rd through february 18th. today the president will also use a bible that belonged to dr. martin luther king jr.. >> very historic bibles there. pretty amazing. pretty good moment in history there we have a front row seat for. happy to be here today covering the 57th presidential inauguration. lauren is at freedom plaza today. she is having a different vantage point of today's ceremony down there with the folks ready to see the parade when it goes by later today. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. i'm happy to be here as well particularly since the sun came out. want to talk about the history of the inaugural parade. the first one taking place for the first president george washington back in 1789. that was held in new york. the first inaugural parade here was in 1801 for thomas jefferson. the first to ever be held on tv, that was for president truman i
of office with his hand on two bibles, one used by abraham lincoln at his inauguration in 1861, and the other a bible which belonged to dr. king. the first covered in velvet and trimmed with gold was loned to lincoln by supreme court clerk william thomas carroll. a seal inside the cover marks the occasion. in the king bible, king noted the dates of sermons he had given. bernice king the youngest of his four children said it was his fawct's traveling bible. >> he used it to study and meditate, not just to speak and preach but just to prepare himself to be able to lead. >> reporter: in a video released by the inaugural committee, president obama calls the lincoln and king bibles a fitting choice. >> their actions, the movements they represented are the only reason that it's possible for me to be inaugurated. >> reporter: turns out that five other presidents have also used two bibles at their swearing in. typically one family wiebl and another of historical significance. eisenhower carter, and george h.w. bush all used george washington's inaugural bible which belonged to the firs
bibles for the public swearing in ceremony. this one is president abraham lincoln's bible when he was sworn in, in 1861. he will use martin luther king jr. personal bible. it has extra significance in this inauguration because it's happening on the federal holiday that honors the civil rights leader. both bibles will be stacked on top of each other. in the first inauguration, the president used the lincoln bible as well. martin luther king jr.'s bible, it was his traveling bible when he would go places to make speeches. he would take that bible with him. he'd be able to study from that bible and pull verses if he wanted to insert things into speeches. >> how is that having your hand on the bible used by lincoln and martin luther king jr. >> absolutely. >> the first family observed martin luther king jr. day on saturday with a day of service, of course. >> with thousands of others. >>> if you're planning to go to the national mall, plan on leaving plenty of extra time. >> you're going to need it. security will be tight for everybody downtown for the event. news 4's megan mcgrath li
's not unprecedented. three presidents in the past have done the same. the first belonged to president lincoln. he used it in his swearing-in in 1861. and the second belonged to martin luther king jr. it was his traveling bible and it's fitting because today is martin luther king day. after the swearing-in, the president and the first lady family and friends, congressional leaders all head in to statuary hall for lunch. this is a tradition that dates back to 1889. they'll dine on bison and good old-fashioned apple pie. >> we go to chief correspondent and host of "face the nation" bob schieffer. he's covering his 12th inaugurations. good morning. >> actually it's 13. i came to lbj's with my mom. she got an invitation. the first one i covered, you're absolutely right, was 1968. and hearing robert gibbs talk about he will stress togetherness and trying to you know, heal this partisan divide it made me think of theodore roosevelt in his inaugural speech. he said at one point our relations with other powers are important, he said, but even more important are our relations among o
the quite remarkable book, april 1865 about lincoln's last days and inauguration is with us here. real quickly, jay, before the president comes out and the vice president, second inaugurations, what is special about them? >> it is special because it marks the continuing of a second term. of course we think of abraham lincoln's masterpiece second inaugural which inspired all americans of his day. i think really it's a day of humility. george washington put it best. he said after taking the oath of office my hand trembles but my heart does not. i think that pretty much sums it up. >> his was the shortest inaugural address, first ever, 135 words. lincoln's was only 700 words in 1865. a lot of people think it was the greatest speech a president ever delivered. >> it was the greatest speech a president ever delivered. the nation was in the throes of a civil war. lincoln was exhausted. before he gave the speech he spent time in the capitol signing bills. there was a lot to work to be done. >> with malice toward none and charity for all. obviously the civil war was about to end and he was ver
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 245 (some duplicates have been removed)

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